Practices for Zero Trust Network Access

What Are the Best Practices for Zero Trust Network Access?

Do you want to learn more about the best practices for Zero Trust Network Access? If so, this section is perfect for you to learn. Let’s take a closer look.

Introduction About ZTNA

The Zero Trust Network Access (ZTNA) is a method of network security. It requires organizations to not trust anything and everything. This is the opposite of how most companies are securing their networks today. 

Most companies are trying to trust everything by using perimeter security to protect all of the assets on their networks. This is the opposite of ZTNA.

There is a lot that goes into implementing ZTNA. But, in this chapter, we are going to focus on the best practices for implementing ZTNA.

What Are the Best Practices for Zero Trust Network Access?

There are many different best practices for implementing ZTNA. The following are some of them:

1. Define the Zero-Trust Model

The first thing that you need to do is define what a zero-trust model is. This will help you understand exactly how you need to change your network security to achieve this model.

2. Identify Perimeters

The next step is to identify where your perimeter is located. You should not have a single perimeter for your entire network. Instead, you should have multiple perimeters that surround different segments of your network. 

These parameters will be different depending on the type of network. For example, a data center has a more limited perimeter that only protects the servers and storage.

If your network is a campus network, then you need to have a perimeter that protects the wired and wireless access points. You should also have a perimeter that protects the users’ devices. 

3. Identify the Trust Authority

Next, you need to identify who is responsible for managing your trust authorities. 

A trusted authority will be a group of people that are responsible for defining who can access what on your network. They are also responsible for making sure that all of the devices on your network are compliant with your security standards and policies. 

This can be a small team or an entire department. The important thing is that they are responsible for protecting all of the assets on your network and not just individual pieces.

They will be responsible for identifying the trust boundaries and defining what are the trust zones. This can be a difficult task, but you can use tools to help you with this. 

4. Identify the Perimeter Control Point(s)

The next step is to identify where your perimeter controls are located. If your network is a data center, then you probably won’t have a single point of control. Instead, you will have multiple perimeters that surround different segments of your network. 

In a data center environment, you will want to identify a three-tier perimeter model that protects the servers and storage. This should be done by using access control lists (ACLs) and firewalls (FWs). 

The first tier is the outermost perimeter. This perimeter protects the network from the Internet. The second tier is for your DMZ. This tier protects your servers and storage. The third tier is for the storage and servers themselves. 

If you are securing a campus environment, then you will need to use wired and wireless ACLs to protect access points. You can also use FW rules to protect wireless networks. 

To Conclude

As you can see, it is important to define what a zero-trust model is. It is also important to identify where the perimeters are located. 

In addition, it is important to identify the trust authorities. These are all best practices for implementing zero-trust network access.

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