How Data Protection Principles Will Change Your Business Strategies

How Data Protection Principles Will Change Your Business Strategies

Data protection principles are changing rapidly. To stay ahead of the curve, you should start implementing them into your business strategy today.

What data protection principles should you follow? This article provides a brief overview.

Overview

In the old days, businesses managed data protection on a per-file or per-database basis. In some cases, they also protected their backup and recovery images. 

This was a secure approach, but it meant that businesses could only protect small amounts of data at one time.

Today, the best way to protect your data is to implement a comprehensive data protection strategy. 

This strategy will cover all of your company’s data: from your PCs and laptops to your mobile devices and servers. It will also cover your backup images and all of your company’s archives.

Under this new strategy, you will have to do more than simply protect existing data. You will also need to set up an effective disaster recovery plan and an effective data backup plan.

Data Protection Principles

There are six data protection principles that every organization should follow: 

1. Limiting access to your data. 

You should have strict rules about who can access your data. This includes your employees, contractors, and partners. It also includes any third-party service providers you work with. 

2. Limiting the type of access to your data. 

You should limit who can read, write or modify your data in any way. And you should also limit who can view or search your data in any way. 

3. Limiting the amount of time that people have access to your data. 

You should give employees, contractors, and partners short-term access to your data. 

This will reduce the amount of time that they can steal or misuse your data. It will also have the added benefit of reducing your storage costs. 

4. Limiting who can modify your data. 

You should create rules about who can add, modify or delete your data in any way. 

You should also create rules about when and where people can modify your data. 

For example, you might allow employees to modify their files at work but not on home computers. And you might allow them to modify files from any computer when they are working in a secure internal network. 

In addition, you might require that they add only a minimal amount of changes to their files. (This will help reduce errors and omissions.) 

5. Limiting who can recover your data. 

In some cases, you will need special tools to recover your data in the event of a disaster. 

This might include backups and recovery images that you store offsite or onsite. It might also include tools like shadow copies or snapshots that you use for disaster recovery purposes. 

6. Limiting who can destroy your data.

You should have strict rules about who can delete or destroy your data in any way.

You should also limit who can send your data to the trash or recycle bin. And you should also limit who can undelete or restore your data from those locations. 

You should also avoid situations where people could accidentally delete or destroy your data. This could happen if they accidentally delete or overwrite files and then use the “undelete” or “restore” feature. 

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